• Brad

    Guess, I should have known this, would have if I had payed more attention in orientation ;-)

    C/O 1991

  • William Sankey

    DuWarn your comments seem to be based on lacking information as to how Tuskegee University began receiving state of Alabama funding. Under the laws of “separate but equal education” in 1890,the President of Alabama A&M the state designated black land grant college defied the white legislative mandate to teach his student only trades and servant roles. Booker T. Washington then President of Tuskegee came forward requesting if they gave him the money he would comply to the mandate.From that point until the 1980,s when the Knight vs Alabama litigation resulted in findings of the State of Alabama mistreating Alabama State and Alabama A&M thru the years, At that point the majority white legislature tried unsuccessfully to take the money back from Tuskegee and give it to Alabama A&M the public designated land grant college.
    An Alabama Attorney General opinion in the 1990,s ruled the act giving Tuskegee public money thru the years made it a public college entitled to appropriations ..Because of the contributions to education coupled with the state of Alabama racist past in creating the problem, Tuskegee has been allowed it to operate as a private college. See Knight vs Alabama for detailed history .

  • http://www.windycityjags.com DuWarn Porter

    Its about time other states where HBCU reside need to do the same. It always amazes me that HBCU have unequally been funded for years and still produce the more African-American graduate with degree combined that all predominately non-HBCU institutions. Just image if the funding to HBCU was equal and fair, hmmm talk about the rise of the black middle class.