White House HBCU Liaison Omarosa Manigault to Resign in January

Omarosa Manigault, a polarizing figure who brought HBCU pedigree to the controversial Trump administration, will resign in January the White House today announced.

The Central State University and Howard University alumna who rose to national recognition as a divisive competitor on Donald Trump’s reality television show ‘The Apprentice,’ lead communications for the White House Office of the Public Liaison after working as a Trump surrogate for African American outreach during his campaign. She held primary oversight over the White House’s HBCU development portfolio, and was viewed by many within the HBCU community as an active voice in key policy making initiatives on behalf of HBCUs.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/davidmack/omarosa-manigault-resigned?utm_term=.eqxaAWEA3P#.gkQpyPzywe

While several presidents and observers recently questioned the activity level of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, Manigault was present for conversations including maintaining Title III reporting measures, which were under review by the Department of Education last month, and framing legislative interpretation during the higher ed re-authorization act drafting, which passed out of committee late last night and moves to the full House for a vote.

That proposed legislation includes graduation rate exemptions, Pell Grant increase conditions, and new workforce development and Title III funding possibilities for HBCUs.

Controversy which punctuated her pre-White House career followed her to Washington, as she was criticized for the her handling of the annual White House conference on HBCUs, perceived disengagement from groups like the HBCU All-Star Ambassadors and communication with HBCU presidents since inauguration.

Morgan State University alumna and White House correspondent April Ryan, who had a publicized run in with Manigault in August, tweeted about the resignation, which she says sources labeled as a heated firing.

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